published 12.05.2016

Off Center: Contemporary Art at the Onassis Cultural Center New York, Fall 2016

For this special edition of Off Center, the editor of our digital journal interviewed the three artists whose work was commissioned in conjunction with the Onassis Festival NY 2016: Antigone Now. Learn more about the vision and process of Alexandra Kehayoglou, Maria Papadimitriou, and Stefanos Tsivopoulos by reading the full interviews below.

Repoussoir for a new perspective, by Alexandra Kehayoglou

Alexandra Kehayoglou’s installation, Repoussoir for a new perspective, is a hand-woven tapestry, made using discarded thread from her family’s carpet factory in Buenos Aires. Commissioned for the “Antigone Now” festival, the two-piece sculptural work portrays the volcanic and heavily mined landscape of Milos, a Greek island in the Cyclades. In exploring what it means to exploit a place for its natural resources, the work ultimately confronts us with a moral challenge not unlike the one face by Antigone.

Art Wall Repoussir New Perspective
Alexandra Kehayoglou

How did you end up making this artwork for the "Antigone Now" festival?

When I was invited to participate in the festival, I was told about Antigone as a starting point. And this year, I had a chance to visit the Greek island Milos, in the Cyclades. I was faced with this situation of seeing that place as a vacation spot--of seeing the way we make use of it as humans; I also got to see another side of it: the exploitation of the land, the mining on this island. Seeing these situations side-by-side, I knew it was a good fit for the Antigone project. And so I made this work, inspired by the Greek landscape-- a possible landscape in which for Antigone to develop.


How did you end up making this artwork for the "Antigone Now" festival?

When I was invited to participate in the festival, I was told about Antigone as a starting point. And this year, I had a chance to visit the Greek island Milos, in the Cyclades. I was faced with this situation of seeing that place as a vacation spot--of seeing the way we make use of it as humans; I also got to see another side of it: the exploitation of the land, the mining on this island. Seeing these situations side-by-side, I knew it was a good fit for the Antigone project. And so I made this work, inspired by the Greek landscape-- a possible landscape in which for Antigone to develop.


How did you end up making this artwork for the "Antigone Now" festival?

When I was invited to participate in the festival, I was told about Antigone as a starting point. And this year, I had a chance to visit the Greek island Milos, in the Cyclades. I was faced with this situation of seeing that place as a vacation spot--of seeing the way we make use of it as humans; I also got to see another side of it: the exploitation of the land, the mining on this island. Seeing these situations side-by-side, I knew it was a good fit for the Antigone project. And so I made this work, inspired by the Greek landscape-- a possible landscape in which for Antigone to develop. 


Laboratory Antigone, by Maria Papadimitriou

Laboratory Antigone, by Maria Papadimitriou, is an immersive installation commissioned for the “Antigone Now” festival. In this multi-part work--which includes photography, collage, video, text, and sculpture-- Papadimitriou focuses her gaze on Sophocles’ play, which she symbolically transposes to an old tannery in Volos, Greece. Ultimately, she creates a space in which to reflect on the history of ancient Thebes, on the family tree of Oedipus, and on the enduring and elusive story of Antigone.

Laboratory Antigone